Children with disabilities

Disabled children are more likely to live in low-income households, have fewer rights in current Law and experience serious discrimination in access to education.

You can read a fact sheet about children with disabilities here. 

In the 2013 Disability Survey, disabled children were less likely to have done the following activities, in the previous four weeks, than non-disabled children were:

  • had music, art, or other similar lessons;
  • played a team sport;
  • done other physical activity such as swimming or gymnastics;
  • visited friends;
  • been away on holiday in last 12 months.

Only 77.8 per cent of disabled children had visited friends, over the previous four weeks, compared to 92 per cent of non-disabled children.

Overseas research has found that Disabled children are at a higher risk of abuse. One of the most comprehensive studies to date, which took place in America, found children with disabilities were, when compared with children without disabilities:

  • 3.8 times more likely to be neglected;
  • 3.8 times more likely to be physically abused;
  • 3.1 times more likely to be sexually abused.

Children with disabilities are more likely to live in poverty. The 2013 Disability Survey found that

  • 34 per cent of disabled children live in families that earn under $50,000 a year, compared to only 24 per cent of non-disabled children.
  • 17.7 per cent of disabled children live in households that earn under $30,000 a year, compared to 11.5 per cent of non-disabled children.
  • Five per cent of disabled children live in households that earn under $15,001 a year, compared to 3.8 per cent of non-disabled children. 

To read more have a look at these blogs:

Early Support talks the need to support families early. 

Stopping bullying talks about the need to take a stand against bullying in schools.

The invisible children talks about disabled children being invisible when it comes to government policy and the work of experts.

Walking the line talks about the line between effective advocacy and being wary of painting people as passive victims.

You can also This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. to ask where to find data and evidence about disabled children.